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Reply by author Edward R. McAllen to Troy Nunes on “Moving Shift Report to the Bedside: An Evidence-Based Quality Improvement Project”

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February 16, 2019

Response by author Edward R. McAllen to Troy Nunes on “Moving Shift Report to the Bedside: An Evidence-Based Quality Improvement Project” (April 9, 2018)

Mr. Nunes,

Thank you for your well written and complimentary response to the Bedside Report article. In the Methods section of the article, under Scripted Reports, there is a discussion that speaks to your concern about what should be included and not included in report and I do think this would be in line with your discussion of a hybrid report (McAllen, Stephens, Swanson-Biearman, Kerr, & Whiteman, 2018). This section discusses how the report would exclude confidential information, information that has not yet been shared with the patient by their physician, and other information that would not be appropriate to share in report. The article discussed and recommended that all staff use their professional judgment to share or not share specific information in report. In the video that was created, as discussed in the article under Methods and Education, it was reinforced that the staff discuss with each patient who could be present when report was given as well as the use of professional judgment for what could be discussed. I again agree that BSR is a hybrid of what many consider to be a complete end of shift handoff. Unfortunately, many organizations say a complete report is to be done at the bedside and this is not feasible or practical considering all of the information you may have to pass on to the next shift. The best way to complete BSR and get staff adoption and buy-in is to use your professional judgment in what you discuss with the patient in report, leaving the more controversial topics (patient history, family issues, new test results, etc.) for discussion away from the patient.

Good luck with your movement towards BSR.

Dr. McAllen

Reference

McAllen, E.R., Stephens, K., Swanson-Biearman, B., Kerr, K., & Whiteman, K (2018). Moving shift report to the bedside: An evidence-based quality improvement project. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 23(2). Available: http://ojin.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol-23-2018/No2-May-2018/Articles-Previous-Topics/Moving-Shift-Report-to-the-Bedside.html

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